Go Away .
Madison | Usually 19 | Texas |
Lamest Loser | Too scared to start the conversation | Too rad fem and bi for the fam 
Go Away .

kelly surdo, dying angels
this was a writing piece i made on the floor of the computer lab at school during after hours. i had been adamantly emotionally unavailable for a dangerous amount of time. it was a moment when something had cracked inside my chest and i felt something warm inside of myself for the first time in forever. i was beginning to let others in again in a way that wasn’t explicitly destructive. i jotted the phrase down as an iphone note, packed my things and walked quickly back to my apartment. the print itself i made at parsons, ronika was allowing us to make prints of some of our work in hopes that a physical form of these pieces that lived solely on the internet would protect me from my demons at bay, at least that was the idea. i think it worked because i still carry them. the piece of silk was the only present i received for my birthday this year, a gift from a good friend who said the texture felt important and reminded me of them. it’s all that mattered. together they make something much greater than me.  
teavibes:


wearethefourthwave:

"THIS PICTURE WILL NOT CHANGE THE WORLD, BUT I STILL NEED FEMINISM AND I’M GOING TO REALLY, REALLY TELL YOU WHY":
-Because I got called a whore for wearing a short plaid skirt when I was 10
-and because when Nujood Ali from Yemen was 10 she got divorced
-Because black girls’ names became my classmates’ favorite “joke” when I was 11
-and because when an 11-year-old girl in Texas was raped by 18 men the New York Times wrote of how the girl “dressed older than her age”
-Because I started counting calories when I was 14
-and because when Malala Yousafzai was 14 she was shot in the head for trying to go to school
-Because I heard a boy greet a girl with “hey slut” today at age 16 -and because when a 16-year-old girl in Steubenville, Ohio was filmed being raped by two boys at a party while unconscious the CNN reporters talked about how tragic it was because the rapists had such bright futures as athletes
-Because I will have to watch my drink at all bars and parties when I am 22
-and because when CeCe McDonald was 22 she was sentenced to 41 months in prison for defending herself against a man who screamed transphobic, racist insults at her and then slashed her face with a bottle
-Because no matter what age I am the biggest threat to men will still be heart disease, and the biggest threat to women will still be men.
-Because it is not just about me, because it is not just about anger, because it is not just a JOKE, because it is not just about “hating men,” because it is not just about girls with vaginas, because it is not just about ending “slut”, because it is not just about white straight girls in Rookie magazine, because it is not just about writing on backs, because it is not just about the fact that gay men are “fags” but lesbians are “hot,” because it is not just about pictures of thin white girls being the only google image results for the search phrase “beautiful women”, because it is not just about writing signs, because it is not just about what she was wearing or how many times she said yes before she changed her answer to no, because misogyny is not just about one thing and feminism is not just about one thing and it is not just “a trend” and it will not “happen” in just one way.
-And because yes. It is about equality for EVERYONE, but first and foremost it needs to be about equality for girls, because they are not treated equally to men, in every single sense, and you are not going to take feminism away from me and call me bossy/hostile/aggressive and make this about yourself or make it into a joke, because truth be told, I’m not joking and I’m tired of explaining. If you want to call yourself a feminist, you work hard to spread feminism, you do not turn this into a contest of whose struggle is greater and constantly demand to know what you can get out of feminism personally. Feminism is not just about you, or me, it is about everyone. If you’re male and you’re tired of men being stereotyped as hyper-masculine, soulless, sexist, inherent leader-tyrant creatures, then go out and prove the patriarchy wrong and fight for girls, like someone with a soul who believes in equality would. Then, yes, feminism will be about everyone.
-Sylvie (an amazing grrrl godess) Photo taken by Caroline http://c-h-0-w.tumblr.com/

^ this
desertislandbrooklyn:

New Splotch
5582db:

Jenny saville
ZoomInfo
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
asylum-art:

In Installation of 4200 Strings of Rice Grains bySayaka Ishizuka

The villagers of Inakadate aren’t the only ones getting creative with their rice. Japanese artist Sayaka Ishizuka is showing new work at Pearl Lam Gallery in Shanghai. “Life Threads” is a walk-in installation consisting of, among other things, 4200 handmade strings of rice grains hung from the ceiling. The work, which took 18 months to complete, looks like rain pouring down onto the earth and being collected in old antique bowls and jars. There is a strong sense of life and interconnectedness throughout the entire piece, given how closely rain, rice and life are intertwined with each other, especially in Asian cultures.
Life Threads is on display through August 23, 2014.
ZoomInfo
america-wakiewakie:

The Surveillance Engine: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google By Ryan Gallagher | The Intercept 
The National Security Agency is secretly providing data to nearly two dozen U.S. government agencies with a “Google-like” search engine built to share more than 850 billion records about phone calls, emails, cellphone locations, and internet chats, according to classified documents obtained by The Intercept.
The documents provide the first definitive evidence that the NSA has for years made massive amounts of surveillance data directly accessible to domestic law enforcement agencies. Planning documents for ICREACH, as the search engine is called, cite the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration as key participants.
ICREACH contains information on the private communications of foreigners and, it appears, millions of records on American citizens who have not been accused of any wrongdoing. Details about its existence are contained in the archive of materials provided to The Intercept by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.
Earlier revelations sourced to the Snowden documents have exposed a multitude of NSA programs for collecting large volumes of communications. The NSA has acknowledged that it shares some of its collected data with domestic agencies like the FBI, but details about the method and scope of its sharing have remained shrouded in secrecy.
ICREACH has been accessible to more than 1,000 analysts at 23 U.S. government agencies that perform intelligence work, according to a 2010 memo. A planning document from 2007 lists the DEA, FBI, Central Intelligence Agency, and the Defense Intelligence Agency as core members. Information shared through ICREACH can be used to track people’s movements, map out their networks of associates, help predict future actions, and potentially reveal religious affiliations or political beliefs.
The creation of ICREACH represented a landmark moment in the history of classified U.S. government surveillance, according to the NSA documents.
“The ICREACH team delivered the first-ever wholesale sharing of communications metadata within the U.S. Intelligence Community,” noted a top-secret memo dated December 2007. “This team began over two years ago with a basic concept compelled by the IC’s increasing need for communications metadata and NSA’s ability to collect, process and store vast amounts of communications metadata related to worldwide intelligence targets.”
The search tool was designed to be the largest system for internally sharing secret surveillance records in the United States, capable of handling two to five billion new records every day, including more than 30 different kinds of metadata on emails, phone calls, faxes, internet chats, and text messages, as well as location information collected from cellphones.
(Read Full Text)
america-wakiewakie:

The Surveillance Engine: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google By Ryan Gallagher | The Intercept 
The National Security Agency is secretly providing data to nearly two dozen U.S. government agencies with a “Google-like” search engine built to share more than 850 billion records about phone calls, emails, cellphone locations, and internet chats, according to classified documents obtained by The Intercept.
The documents provide the first definitive evidence that the NSA has for years made massive amounts of surveillance data directly accessible to domestic law enforcement agencies. Planning documents for ICREACH, as the search engine is called, cite the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration as key participants.
ICREACH contains information on the private communications of foreigners and, it appears, millions of records on American citizens who have not been accused of any wrongdoing. Details about its existence are contained in the archive of materials provided to The Intercept by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.
Earlier revelations sourced to the Snowden documents have exposed a multitude of NSA programs for collecting large volumes of communications. The NSA has acknowledged that it shares some of its collected data with domestic agencies like the FBI, but details about the method and scope of its sharing have remained shrouded in secrecy.
ICREACH has been accessible to more than 1,000 analysts at 23 U.S. government agencies that perform intelligence work, according to a 2010 memo. A planning document from 2007 lists the DEA, FBI, Central Intelligence Agency, and the Defense Intelligence Agency as core members. Information shared through ICREACH can be used to track people’s movements, map out their networks of associates, help predict future actions, and potentially reveal religious affiliations or political beliefs.
The creation of ICREACH represented a landmark moment in the history of classified U.S. government surveillance, according to the NSA documents.
“The ICREACH team delivered the first-ever wholesale sharing of communications metadata within the U.S. Intelligence Community,” noted a top-secret memo dated December 2007. “This team began over two years ago with a basic concept compelled by the IC’s increasing need for communications metadata and NSA’s ability to collect, process and store vast amounts of communications metadata related to worldwide intelligence targets.”
The search tool was designed to be the largest system for internally sharing secret surveillance records in the United States, capable of handling two to five billion new records every day, including more than 30 different kinds of metadata on emails, phone calls, faxes, internet chats, and text messages, as well as location information collected from cellphones.
(Read Full Text)